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Perhaps one of the most interesting speakers at the PTAB Bar Association annual conference on March 22, 2018 was Chief Judge Ruschke. Ruschke highlighted several statistics at the Board including the ever-diminishing backlog for ex parte appeals. Noticeably proud of this effort, which we report on below, Ruschke deserves credit for being at the helm of the PTAB during this time of a historic drop in appeals backlog.

Several months back, we reported on the dip in ex parte appeals backlog comparing fiscal year 2016 with fiscal year 2017. Since then, the USPTO recently released a chart, of which Chief Judge Ruschke spoke, that tracks a moving monthly average for February 2018 with February 2017. Here is the new chart available here at the USPTO.

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Any way you slice it, this chart with updated data shows that the PTAB appeals backlog continues its plunge. For biotech/chemical art, this decrease is pronounced. For example, for tech center 1600, which previously dipped all the way to 19.2 months as we reported previously, the backlog is now down to 18.3 months. For tech center 1700, which we reported as previously dipping to 16.9 months, is now down to an impressive 13.1 months.

For computer/electrical art, the backlog shows modest, but consistent declines. Tech center 2100 had previously dipped to 13.2 months. Now, it has decreased to 13 months. Tech center 2400, which had previously dipped its backlog to 12.7, now has a backlog of 12.5 months. Tech center 2600, previously at 13 months, now has the backlog lowered to 12.8. Finally, tech center 2800, which dipped to 16.9 months is now at 14.4 months.

The tech center with the most number of forwarded appeals is 3600, home of many business method applications. This tech center had previously decreased to 22.4 months. Now this backlog is all the way down to 19.3 months.

Finally, tech center 3700, home to mechanical and biomedical art, had previously decreased its backlog to 23 months. Now, the tech center’s backlog has decreased even further to 15.2 months.

The appeal backlog is calculated as the amount of time from when the appeal is forwarded to the Board (shortly after an Examiner’s Answer is issued) until a final decision is made. As this backlog increasingly shortens, the decision to pursue an appeal becomes more attractive. This, in combination with recent increases in USPTO fees that disproportionately makes more expensive pursuing continuing prosecution with RCEs. This also, knowing that some grounds of rejection statistically get overturned at higher levels than you might think. You can see for yourself how your specific grounds of rejection are handled at the Board to guide your particular prosecution strategy.

From all accounts, Chief Judge Ruschke does not intend to discontinue the work at cutting the backlog for ex parte appeals. We at Anticipat.com will continue to track this as well as other PTAB appeals statistics. Stay tuned for developments such as backlog that can affect the decision to pursue an ex parte appeal.